A Progressive Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire Christ Episcopal Church
About
Copyright 2017 Christ Episcopal Church, Portsmouth, New Hampshire  03801     603-436-8842     christportsnh@comcast.net
Christ Church’s History

The original Christ Church...

Our roots: a mission to factory workers

Christ Church began as a mission to factory workers in the mid 19th century.The original Gothic-revival building was constucted on Madison Street in 1883 and burned down in 1963. The current building on Lafayette Road was built in 1967 on land donated by John Elwyn-Stone. The parcel contains a colonial cemetery where African slaves of Governor John Langdon are buried and is on the Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail.  Christ Church was the"high" Episcopal Church in the diocese, having been influenced by the Oxford Movement. Worship continues to be important as well as our commitment to issues of peace and social justice. On September 5, 1905 Christ Church was the site for the service following the signing of the Treaty of Portsmouth, ending the Russo-Japanese War. In 2005 Christ Church participated in events to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing. Our bell rang at the conclusion of a memorial service, just as it did in 1905. 
The original Christ Episcopal Church and its Rectory were located on Madison Street approximately opposite the end of Austin Street.

Here’s how our church looked in 1966...

Note the absence of shrubbery or trees!

The church as it appears today

The picture above was taken at our 125th Anniversary Celebration in 2008.

On that same spot now...

Where the church and parish house once stood, there is now an apartment complex. This neighborhood, which was once enhanced by the beauty of a fine old, native stone church, has been transformed by its loss.
A Progressive Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire Christ Episcopal Church
About
Copyright 2017 Christ Episcopal Church, Portsmouth, New Hampshire  03801     603-436-8842     christportsnh@comcast.net

The original Christ Church...

Our roots: a mission

to factory workers

Christ Church began as a mission to factory workers in the mid 19th century.The original Gothic-revival building was constucted on Madison Street in 1883 and burned down in 1963. The current building on Lafayette Road was built in 1967 on land donated by John Elwyn-Stone. The parcel contains a colonial cemetery where African slaves of Governor John Langdon are buried and is on the Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail.  Christ Church was the"high" Episcopal Church in the diocese, having been influenced by the Oxford Movement. Worship continues to be important as well as our commitment to issues of peace and social justice. On September 5, 1905 Christ Church was the site for the service following the signing of the Treaty of Portsmouth, ending the Russo-Japanese War. In 2005 Christ Church participated in events to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing. Our bell rang at the conclusion of a memorial service, just as it did in 1905. 
The original Christ Episcopal Church and its Rectory were located on Madison Street approximately opposite the end of Austin Street.
On that same spot now... Where the church and parish house once stood, there is now an apartment complex. This neighborhood, which was once enhanced by the beauty of a fine old, native stone church, has been transformed by its loss.

The church as it appears today

The picture above was taken at our 125th Anniversary Celebration in 2008.
Christ Church’s History